New Yorkers Say No to Anti-Semitism

Tens of thousands turned out in Foley Square in Lower Manhattan on Sunday morning, January 5, to send a clear message rejecting the recent wave of anti-Semitic violence in the New York area.
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By the tens of thousands, New Yorkers turned out on Sunday, January 5, to stand in solidarity against anti-Semitism in the wake of numerous recent attacks targeting the area’s Jewish community.

Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, with her wife, Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum, the leader of Congregation Beit Simchat Torah, the LGBTQ synagogue whose members turned out in big numbers.
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The throngs gathered in Foley Square in Lower Manhattan for a march over the Brooklyn Bridge to a rally in Cadman Plaza.

Throngs jammed Foley Square early on Sunday morning.
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Dubbed “No Hate, No Fear,” the gathering aimed to make clear, in the words of the UJA Federation of New York, that, “The 1.5 million Jews of our great city and region will not stand down.”

Many faiths joined together to say, “Coexist.”
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Congregation Beit Simchat Torah Senior Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum, who was on hand with her wife, Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, told Gay City News, “We stand with our immigrant and Muslim communities when they are under attack and we are deeply moved to be joined by allies condemning anti-Semitism. We call on all people of all sexual orientations and gender identities, and whatever other identities we hold dear, to continue being the reason that others believe in the goodness of people.”

Fogo Azul, New York’s all-women Brazilian Samba Raggae drum corps, was on hand.
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Jason Rosenberg, an out gay Jewish New Yorker and a member of ACT UP, said the march represented an opportunity to resist all forms of discrimination, including anti-Semitism, racism, transphobia, and more.

A message from the son of Holocaust survivors.
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“I think we are seeing internal tensions in the Jewish community, and I think it’s important we come together and we show up for people along the margins of denomination and identity and to celebrate the diversity of the Jewish faith,” Rosenberg said.

A message of strength and resilience from a young one.
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The march followed an escalation of anti-Semitic attacks locally, especially during the month of December. There was a deadly attack at a kosher supermarket in Jersey City on December 10, and on December 28, a man invaded a Hasidic rabbi’s home in the New York City suburb of Monsey and stabbed half a dozen people celebrating a Hanukkah party. There have been numerous other anti-Semitic on buses, in the street, and on train platforms, among other public spaces.

New York’s Jewish community received international support.
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Two generations stand up to hate, reject fear.
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Other faiths stood in solidarity with the Jewish community.
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CUNY staff members standing up to hate.
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